Epigenetics: The Next Frontier for Cancer Research

The unique perspective from epigenetics in cancer as compared to the more conventional dichotomy of genes versus the environment are particularly noticeable in the discussions of a recent paper by Cristian Tomasetti and Bert Vogelstein[2] on the causes of cancer which has already generated a significant amount of controversy

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“Understanding the Impact of Epigenetics” podcast

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) Understanding the Impact of Epigenetics podcast Below are links to posts and papers I mention in this podcast about epigenetics and health that I participated in as a panel member hosted by the health and fitness website BreakingMuscle.com: When it Comes to Epigenetics, How Much Fun is Too Much? Comment and Reply Epigenetics By Any Other Name? What … Continue reading “Understanding the Impact of Epigenetics” podcast

Epigenetics Minority Report Part I: Epigenetics, blame, precrime and politics

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) If you picked up the movie reference in the title to this post, you are likely (hopefully) asking yourself “Minority Report? And epigenetics? Really?”  The answer to this question is “Yes…perhaps,” but while the reference is meant in fun, this connection between epigenetics and Minority Report raises some serious points for discussion. … Continue reading Epigenetics Minority Report Part I: Epigenetics, blame, precrime and politics

Gene Sequence but not Structure? The Costs of Excluding Epigenetics from Genomics

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) (Thanks for stopping by and reading this post. I’ve linked to a number of other resources in this post, so check those out as well. When you’re done, leave a comment and let me—and the others who read this post—know what you think. This post is attracting a lot of attention from … Continue reading Gene Sequence but not Structure? The Costs of Excluding Epigenetics from Genomics

Research Paper of the Week: Pesticide Methoxychlor Promotes the Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult-Onset Disease through the Female Germline

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) Pesticide Methoxychlor Promotes the Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult-Onset Disease through the Female Germline Policy implications: As this research involves the epigenetic effects of exposure to a very common pesticide and insecticide, there are all sorts of implications for agricultural policies and FDA food safety regulations. These results also address the transgenerational … Continue reading Research Paper of the Week: Pesticide Methoxychlor Promotes the Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult-Onset Disease through the Female Germline