The Political Implications of Epigenetics: Emerging Narratives and Ideologies

Does epigenetics challenge contemporary political ideologies? This small study may serve as a starting point for broader studies of epigenetics as it comes to affect political ideologies and, in turn, public policies. The narrative mix reported here could yet prove vulnerable to ideological capture, or, more optimistically, could portend the emergence of a "third-way" narrative using epigenetics to question atomistic individualism and allowing for less divisiveness in public-health domains such as obesity.

Advertisements

Epigenetics and Public Policy: The Tangled Web of Science and Politics

The cover art for my forthcoming book Epigenetics and Public Policy: The Tangled Web of Science and Politics has been approved, and a tentative release date set (January 2018). Stay tuned here, as I will post excerpts and work in progress as I finish the writing of this book. "This book comprehensively considers the political implications of … Continue reading Epigenetics and Public Policy: The Tangled Web of Science and Politics

Epigenetics and the Extended Synthesis

If there are so many science-based reasons for the inclusion of epigenetics within genetics, why has it been so maligned for so long? A plausible answer is that there are even stronger non-scientific reasons for this exclusion of epigenetics, and my working theory in this post is that these non-scientific reasons are a function of key differences in the ‘hidden’ ethical commitments of epigenetics and conventional genetics.

When it Comes to Epigenetics, How Much Fun is Too Much? Comment and Reply

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) This post began as a simple reply to a comment from Alison M to this post about epigenetics and drug discovery, but suddenly bloomed into a full-fledged post of its own. Below is Alison M's original comment in italics for purely aesthetic purposes, followed by my reply (and I think Alison is actually … Continue reading When it Comes to Epigenetics, How Much Fun is Too Much? Comment and Reply

Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics IV: Did Aristotle and Aquinas Discover DNA?

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics I Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics II Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics III The next step in the chain of reasoning that produces both the modern self and the genome, and which also helps to explain both the scientific and non-scientific objections to epigenetics, is the elaboration of the soul … Continue reading Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics IV: Did Aristotle and Aquinas Discover DNA?

Early Life Nutrition, Epigenetics and Programming of Later Life Disease

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) Early Life Nutrition, Epigenetics and Programming of Later Life Disease Author: Mark H. Vickers Journal: Nutrient Publication Date: June 2, 2014 Affiliation: Liggins Institute and Gravida, National Centre for Growth and Development, University of Auckland, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1142, New Zealand Policy Implications: This paper is a review of the human and … Continue reading Early Life Nutrition, Epigenetics and Programming of Later Life Disease

Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics III: Genetics and the Rise of Christianity

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics I Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics II Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics IV The previous section established the historical foundations of the concept of the autonomous ‘self’ upon which are constructed both modern ethics and contemporary genetics. This section will continue the historical elaboration of this concept, focusing on the … Continue reading Epigenetics and Environmental Ethics III: Genetics and the Rise of Christianity