Epigenetics and Two of its Cold War Casualties

by Shea Robison The highly political and ideological history of epigenetics discussed here and here and here helps to explain why epigenetics has only just now emerged as a signficant field of scientific research, as well as why epigenetics has such a mixed reception even today. Below are two examples of the chilling influence of world politics … Continue reading Epigenetics and Two of its Cold War Casualties

History, Part III: Epigenetics and the Dustbin of History

by Shea Robison In addition to the reasons discussed here and here, another cause for the split between genetics and epigenetics, and the different trajectories of each, has to do with geography and world events. As mentioned before, the fields of genetics and embryology – which was where most of the work on epigenetics was being … Continue reading History, Part III: Epigenetics and the Dustbin of History

History, Part II: Epigenetics and the Politics of Science

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) As discussed in the previous post in this series, if epigenetics had been accepted into the mainstream of genetics at this early stage of its development, epigenetics likely would have been incorporated into the overall theoretical structure of genetics without too much disruption.  Instead, for many years the field of modern genetics disqualified epigenetics … Continue reading History, Part II: Epigenetics and the Politics of Science

History, Part I: A Brief History of Epigenetics

by Shea Robison (@EpigeneticsGuy) In the history of modern Western evolutionary theory, the first use of the term epigenetics is generally attributed to Conrad Waddington in an article published in 1942.[1]  In this article Waddington used epigenetics as the name for the study of the causal mechanisms through which genes bring about their phenotypic effects and … Continue reading History, Part I: A Brief History of Epigenetics